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Ptil Tekhelet - פתיל תכלת

​The remarkable Story of An Ancient Colour Lost To History & Rediscovered - an interview with Baruch Sterman in IsraelFirst TV Programme. ... See MoreSee Less

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ROYGBIV – these are the colors of the rainbow. The “I”, of course, stands for Indigo – the color of Tekhelet. Since the days of Newton, science has been able to explain the physical laws and conditions that produce the beautiful spectrum that is a rainbow. The Torah in this week’s parsha, however, gives a different explanation. Hashem showed Noach the rainbow as a sign that He would never again destroy the world. Many commentators are bothered by the apparent discrepancy between the scientific vs. the religious view of the rainbow and wonder if the laws of physics were somehow different before and after the flood that allowed for the formation of rainbows.

One possibility is raised by Rabbi Shlomo Ephraim ben Aaron Luntschitzthe (d. 1619) in his work Keli Yakar, and that is that rainbows existed since Creation, even before the flood, but mankind never paid attention to them. Here then, we might suggest another connection between rainbows and Tekhelet. Rabbi Meir tells us that Tekhelet reminds us of the sea, which reminds us of the sky, which reminds us of Hashem’s holy throne. Indeed all these are colored with an intense, mesmerizing, and incredibly beautiful blue. But take a cup of sea – water – and it is transparent. The same is true of a little bit of sky – air – completely colorless. Whether one sees beauty, meaning, depth, significance, or instead one sees nothing at all, is completely dependent on one’s point of view. Even the most dazzling and remarkable – God’s holy throne or a rainbow – can be overlooked and ignored if one fails to pay attention.

Perhaps one thought to consider when kissing the Tekhelet tzitzit each morning is to fill the day with mindfulness, to be sure to take notice of the beautiful and the sublime.
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Hadran Alach – “We will return to you” – is the way Jews end a section of learning. Today with mixed emotions we say goodbye to Perek Hatekhelet in the Daf Yomi cycle. The next time it comes around will be Rosh Chodesh Adar 5786, February 18, 2026. And so, we offer this prayer to Hashem: May it be Thy will that just as we have had the zechut to learn Perek Hatekhelet in this Daf Yomi cycle, so may we be zocheh to learn it in many more cycles to come! ... See MoreSee Less

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On Simchat Torah we read V’Zot HaBracha, the last words of Moshe Rabbenu and his blessing to each tribe. To the tribe of Zevullun, Moshe says: שֶׁפַע יַמִּים יִינָקוּ וּשְׂפֻנֵי טְמוּנֵי חוֹל – “they draw from the riches of the sea and the hidden treasures of the sand” (Devarim 33;19) What do these cryptic words mean, and to what is Moshe referring? Yonatan ben Uziel (a student of Hillel in the 1st century) explains these words and writes in his (Aramaic) translation: אֲרוּם עַל סְפַר יַמָא רַבָּא שָׁרָן, וְיִתְפַּרְנְקוּן מִן טָרִיתָא, וְחַלְזוֹנָא יְאַחְדוּן וְיִצְבְּעוּן מֵאַדְמֵיהּ תִּיכְלָא לְחוּטֵי גוּלְיַתְהוֹן – “For they [the tribe of Zevullun] dwell by shores of the great sea, and make their livelihood from its bounties, and they collect the chillazon and dye with its blood Tekhelet for the threads of their robes.” The treasures that Zevullun were blessed with are none other than the sea-snails from which the beautiful and expensive sky-blue dye is obtained, allowing Jews to fulfil the mitzvah of Tekhelet on their tzitzit. After more than a thousand years when those treasures lay hidden in the sand, their identity forgotten and secrets lost to history, our generation is privileged to share in Zevullun’s bounties and in Moshe’s blessing, with the rediscovery of the chillazon and Tekhelet once again hanging on the tzitzit. ... See MoreSee Less

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חידה: באיזה חג יהודי נהוג היה לשרוף תכלת? חושבים שאתם יודעים? >> ענו בתגובות! ... See MoreSee Less

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